Designer Collection – Michael Kors Outlet 2013 http://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 16:59:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-140x136.png Designer Collection – Michael Kors Outlet 2013 http://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/ 32 32 Houses: Storage that goes far beyond utility https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/houses-storage-that-goes-far-beyond-utility/ Wed, 18 May 2022 16:59:04 +0000 https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/houses-storage-that-goes-far-beyond-utility/ Placeholder while loading article actions You might think of storage cabinets as utilitarian. But designers are always fascinated by how a simple wardrobe can be constructed, dressed and adorned in ways that showcase craftsmanship and inventiveness. There are sleek, low consoles with jeweled handles. Chic deco style bar cabinets. Rustic credenzas carved in wood. And […]]]>
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You might think of storage cabinets as utilitarian. But designers are always fascinated by how a simple wardrobe can be constructed, dressed and adorned in ways that showcase craftsmanship and inventiveness.

There are sleek, low consoles with jeweled handles. Chic deco style bar cabinets. Rustic credenzas carved in wood. And some pieces dressed in artistic flourishes, or that are even art themselves.

Far from being workhorses, these casegoods are dressage ponies, ready for their close-ups.

“These new cabinets are detailed in a way that isn’t just a rectangular box with straight metal legs. They have some interesting details. And people who design storage furniture these days think about those details, think what the legs and doors, etc. look like says San Francisco interior designer Jay Jeffers.

He also says that “the use of mixed materials is a trend – rattan, ebonized oak and grasscloth-covered furniture”.

Jeffers has imagined a new collection of wardrobes for Artillery. The Cantu Oak Cabinet, one of his favorites, features fluted brass hardware and an arrow-like beveled outer edge. “I designed it to look like a work of art,” he says.

Jeffers is mindful of multifunctionality when designing a wardrobe: the Cantu piece, for example, has shelves that can be pulled out to store clothes. And he loves using it as a bar cabinet for entertaining.

Italian manufacturer of contemporary furniture France collaborated with Shanghai-based architecture and design firm Neri + Hu on the Mi cabinet series. “Mi” can mean “watch” and “secret” in Chinese, and the pieces play on the term by placing the contained behind an oblong leather outer shell, then placing the top marble shelf a few inches above the base, creating a peek-a-boo space.

Designate Lindye Galloway of Costa Mesa, California, draws inspiration from its roots in the Golden State. Its Bixby hutch features the rounded silhouette of the arch of Big Sur’s Bixby Canyon Bridge, in natural teak trimmed in black. And its California credenza brings a modern coastal vibe to a teak-framed, rattan-fronted cabinet with brass accents.

Caning is also a feature of Leanne Ford’s new collection for Crate and barrel. Its 80-inch-high, 45-inch-wide Fields cabinet has a white oak lower section and an airy rattan upper. Gently rounded corners and a natural blonde finish give this large piece a light footprint. And a drum-shaped bar cabinet highlights the woven material, in natural or anthracite.

Lenny Kravitz, who got into product design, also collaborates with Crate & Barrel. Highlights include the Paseo cabinet, with Cubist motifs and African-inspired details, and the Kibo credenza, combining French Brutalist and industrial elements in a heavy oak frame with polished and pleated steel doors.

From architect and product designer Ezra Ardolino Timbour studio come two credenzas crafted from thin stacked layers of Baltic birch. The material has a linear quality similar to a topographic map. The Fresnel model has slatted doors like the large theater light from which it takes its name. And the Bubble cabinet presents the laminated layers in the form of concentric rings. Both credenzas open to reveal a playful and spicy purple interior.

Room and board teamed up with St. Louis-based refrigeration company True Residential to create the Amherst Cabinet, a nifty white oak or walnut storage cabinet with a built-in fridge that can serve as a resting place for a TV, books or works of art.

Deny Designs has an extensive collection of Baltic Birch credenzas with artist designed front panels; they could be an interesting way to bring art into a room where wall space is limited. Available at various retailers.

A misty mountainside forest rises in front of the Studio 83 Oranges’ Forest Fog cabinet, available on Overstock. Photographer Bree Madden’s dreamy images of Southern California landscapes and landmarks feature in a collection of Haven. And to Targetthere is a range of tribal prints, illustrated flowers and groovy graphic patterns on the Deny cabinets.

Finally, if you really want to get into the idea of ​​the wardrobe as an art form, there is by Jonathan Adler Spring 2022 collection and Boca do Lobo avant-garde designs, made in Portugal.

The exterior of Boca do Lobo’s Pixel bar cabinet is covered with more than a thousand multicolored triangles made of woods such as rosewood and African walnut, evoking a pixelated image. Inside, a mirror and blue silk quilted with diamonds highlight nine drawers, each with a golden button.

Then there is the Lapiaz cabinet collection, named after the geological phenomenon of erosion. Craftsmen create molten metal channels that fit into cabinetry clad in walnut, burl poplar, ebony or stainless steel. The pieces may look opulent in some rooms, but in a minimalist interior they would be more reminiscent of the Japanese art of kinsugi, in which broken dishes are repaired with liquid metals.

“Every room in your home is an opportunity for visual drama, for high-tension design,” says Adler.

Its spring collection includes the Kiki cabinet, which nods to the Art Deco trend. The cabinet is faced with rows of plump, lacquered caps, in ivory or deep teal, edged in brushed brass. Two velvet-lined drawers are stored inside.

Luminous blue acrylic cabochons set in brass, on a white lacquer base, give Adler’s Globo cabinet a futuristic vibe. And Adler calls his Turin bar “chic, graphic and an instant classic.” Modernist Milan comes to mind with the room’s panes painted in dark hues and then arranged in a fractal design.

Kim Cook writes frequently for The AP on design, decor and lifestyle topics. She can be found on Instagram at @kimcookhome and reached at kim@kimcookhome.com.

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Mmuso Maxwell Designers on the Karl Lagerfeld Prize for Innovation https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/mmuso-maxwell-designers-on-the-karl-lagerfeld-prize-for-innovation/ Mon, 16 May 2022 22:42:04 +0000 https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/mmuso-maxwell-designers-on-the-karl-lagerfeld-prize-for-innovation/ After a two-year internship with veteran South African designer David Tlale, Mmuso Maxwell was born. The brand, founded by the young duo Mmuso Potsan and Maxwell Boko, has since made a name for herself in the African fashion industry. Featuring hit works with big-name artists like Beyoncé — on her black is king album – […]]]>

After a two-year internship with veteran South African designer David Tlale, Mmuso Maxwell was born. The brand, founded by the young duo Mmuso Potsan and Maxwell Boko, has since made a name for herself in the African fashion industry. Featuring hit works with big-name artists like Beyoncé — on her black is king album – they continue to raise the bar on what it means to be a successful emerging designer brand.

The duo started making noise in 2017, when they won South African Fashion Week’s Sunglass Hut New Talent Search. Two years later, they came second in 30 Under 30: the new stars Arise Fashion Show competition held in Lagos, Nigeria. The duo went home with $50,000, helping them establish their presence on the global landscape.

Last month, Potsane and Boko won the biggest award of their career: in front of 200 designers around the world, they won the Karl Lagerfeld Prize for Innovation, after presenting a merino wool collection for their Fall/ Winter 2022.

After their big win, OkayAfrica got to meet the duo and discuss their upbringing, winning the Lagerfeld Prize, and more.

How would you describe your brand Mmuso Maxwell?

Maxwell Boko: I think the perfect description of our brand is that it is inspired by African heritage, but most importantly it is intertwined with contemporary culture. It’s basically our perspective on our heritage. We are modern young people who live with technology and science and are influenced by these things. So while it’s still our African heritage, it’s still our own interpretation.

Mmuso Potsan: Our brand is a modern interpretation of who an African woman is. Our brand sees itself as a global brand, and we don’t want to limit it to look like an ordinary African brand, but position ourselves as a global brand, while retaining our African roots, interpretations and experiences.

How did the collaboration between you two come about?

Potsan: We met during the 2015-2017 internship. At the end of the internship, we decided to bring our pieces together to make a single collection because we had a similar aesthetic. From there, we just decided to continue as a brand.

It’s interesting. You know, the fashion industry can most of the time be more competition than collaboration. How do you navigate times when you might have contrasting ideas?

Boko: I think the reason we teamed up was because we had similar tastes in general. What has worked for us over the five years is that we are not dramatic in our approach to things. It’s not “this or nothing”. We are always open to criticism from each other. We don’t question our individual strengths at all.

Potsan: Yeah, we kind of found a way to agree to disagree. We kind of found a way to come together to have a vision and an objection. So for us, if one of us has really strong feelings about something, we just give them a chance to see how it goes. If not, we find a way to navigate it.

Saul Nash, winner of the International Woolmark Prize, and Mmuso Potsane and Maxwell Boko of Mmuso Maxwell, winners of the Karl Lagerfeld Prize for Innovation, celebrate with models wearing their designs.

Photo credit: David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images for Woolmark International Pty Ltd

What if you won the Woolmark Karl Lagerfeld Innovation Award? How did it happen?

Boko: I mean, we applied, although I told Mmuso that Woolmark is something that’s going to happen to us, maybe in two or three years, and that’s because it’s usually for established designers. I always thought it would come later for us. So when they contacted us to let us know we were finalists, I thought, “this is crazy”.

When I saw the other finalists, I thought there was no chance of winning; But as we progressed through the program, I realized why it was the right time for us. It has helped us as a brand in terms of making our products. The eight months were very difficult, but what I enjoyed the most was working with local artisans. I think that’s even one of the reasons why we won.

And right next to it, I think it’s very difficult for us to see from the inside how important winning the prize is. It is always our faithful collaborators who help us to see and understand it.

How has winning this award influenced your brand? I mean, how important do you think platforms like this are?

Potsan: I think it’s important because it allows you to access spaces in the industry that are very out of reach for a lot of African brands. It influences us and helps us to think more/differently, and just at that level, to play by the rules. You no longer think locally, but internationally. It made us more serious about our business and how to run it. People take your job more seriously, which makes you take it more seriously too.

In terms of funding, it’s been a struggle. I mean, as a designer you have to showcase your work and that requires a lot of money for things like shows, showrooms, etc. With the help we’re getting from people like Birimian – sort of an investment group for African brands – it helps you take the stress out of it.

And what are some of the challenges you have faced during this time? Are there any ways you navigate now?

Boko: When we launched our brand, we had no initial capital to start our brand. But we got some support, and that made our next challenge the sustainability of our future collections; but recently our major challenge has been fabric sourcing and production. There are no facilities to produce the quality we aspire to.

Potsan: To address these challenges, we’re really moving forward one step at a time, and also talking with those who can help with things like this, like Birimian. In terms of production, we have to find a compromise to make sure we get the quality we want.

You are an enduring brand. What are some of the practices you do that make it sustainable?

Potsan: We use local crafts and local artisans. It’s something we’ve been passionate about ever since we created our brand. We use local yarns for production and working with artisans takes us down the slow fashion route.

Boko: We have always had an affinity for natural fibers since our beginnings. As an African creative, you are inherently sustainable because we are not prone to waste. It’s not something we can afford. When we buy fabrics, we buy exactly what we need, and everything we’ve done so far has been pre-order. We don’t produce in the hope that someone will buy what we’ve made. All parts go to our customers.

Are there any creatives that inspire the work you do?

Potsan: The people who inspire our brand with whom we are already currently working. So people love Tatenda Chidora, a photographer. We like too Tony eraser. She’s an incredible artist. Same as Chloe Andrea and Daniel Obassi. We totally love these people and we are strongly inspired by them.

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Bright color in times of war. Anna Antal’s Remarkable AAFW Collection https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/bright-color-in-times-of-war-anna-antals-remarkable-aafw-collection/ Sun, 15 May 2022 09:35:18 +0000 https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/bright-color-in-times-of-war-anna-antals-remarkable-aafw-collection/ 1 credit SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA: When creating her first collection for Australia’s Afterpay Fashion Week 2022, the biggest challenge designer Michelle Tucker faced was moral. Her year-old brand, Anna Antal, is named after her beloved designer grandmother, born in Hungary in 1922 – a rebellious era when designers began to counter the constraining fashions of stiffened […]]]>
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SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA: When creating her first collection for Australia’s Afterpay Fashion Week 2022, the biggest challenge designer Michelle Tucker faced was moral. Her year-old brand, Anna Antal, is named after her beloved designer grandmother, born in Hungary in 1922 – a rebellious era when designers began to counter the constraining fashions of stiffened crinolines, under structures and corsetry. But for Hungarian women, this new sense of freedom and movement was compromised a few years later.

“When Russia invaded Hungary in 1956, my grandmother was badly affected by the atrocities of war,” Tucker tells GRAZIA, citing that Antal fled his war-torn homeland and opened a shop in Melbourne, Australia, in 1960.

“When war broke out in Ukraine recently, I didn’t know if it was appropriate to present a collection that encouraged feelings of optimism and celebration,” Tucker continues. “But after careful thought and reflection, I realized that the war had already taken so much from my grandmother and her family and that I was not going to allow it to take away this opportunity.”

And that she didn’t. One of the standout collections of this AAFW season, Tucker (who previously worked in sales at an investment bank and is a mother of four) invited reporters into an immersive living room-style space on Friday morning. An untamed palette of acid bright colors in tangerines, moss greens and ruby ​​pinks threaded through the room; a kaleidoscope of casual patterns that intersect before dissipating into uniquely cut evening gowns, lavish suits and trouser and top combos worthy of an international glamorous soiree.

Anna Antal
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Anna Antal
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Interestingly, Tucker’s inspiration was the guest rooms of the Riad El Fenn hotel in Marrakech, “a hidden gem in one of the most dynamic and exotic cities in the world”, she says.

“To live Marrakech well, you have to immerse yourself in the color, the dynamism and the artisanal heritage of the city”, she continues. “Rich and welcoming, each room at Riad El Fenn does just that! Uniquely decorated in bright jewel tones and filled with contemporary artwork and colorful, eclectic curiosities, no two rooms are the same. I imagined each piece of the Resort 2023 collection as its own uniquely decorated guest room at Riad Anna Antal.

Anna Antal
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Anna Antal
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Anna Antal
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We imagine that such a place would be very elegant. Tucker gave me a Anna Antal’s piece wear to the show and during my rushed morning I was struck for a minute not just by how the garment felt (soft and hip-skimming) but how it made me feel wearing it (striking, powerful, confident.) Every room I walked into that day — and there were eight of them — many people commented on the unique pattern and style.

“We all have a more confident, secure version of us lurking somewhere and now is the time to release and embrace unlimited possibilities,” says Tucker. “Anna Antal was officially launched in October 2021. Launching the brand during a global pandemic took a lot of courage, but I truly believed people needed hope. My pieces allow people to dream of a life outside of a global pandemic. I wanted the collection to give them permission to dream of a life that would be wonderful again.

She’s right. What a wonderful thought it is to dress up and have a place to go. Well done, Michele.

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Catching up with Paul Smith – WWD https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/catching-up-with-paul-smith-wwd/ Fri, 13 May 2022 16:33:41 +0000 https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/catching-up-with-paul-smith-wwd/ NEW YORK — Thanks to the pandemic, it has been more than two years since Paul Smith was able to travel to the United States. That meant its New York flagship, which opened in September 2020 on Wooster Street in SoHo, had to be designed remotely from the UK. But with the health crisis easing […]]]>

NEW YORK Thanks to the pandemic, it has been more than two years since Paul Smith was able to travel to the United States. That meant its New York flagship, which opened in September 2020 on Wooster Street in SoHo, had to be designed remotely from the UK. But with the health crisis easing somewhat, the British designer was finally able to return to the United States to see the store in person.

He liked what he saw.

The 5,000 square foot unit, which carries the men’s and women’s collections, is more open and inviting than the former location on Greene Street.

“It’s really exciting to see the store we’ve designed online,” Smith said. “The Greene Street store was more separate rooms, whereas it’s a really open plan. What we found interesting is that a lot of people who don’t necessarily know Paul Smith feel comfortable coming here. It’s very welcoming with the marble stairs and leather railings. They can come in and be curious.

And this increased interest leads to increased sales.

Jeremy Smith, president of Paul Smith North America, said the store was doing better than Greene Street in 2019, before the pandemic hit, “and that’s without tourism fully returning.”

Among the top performers, he said, was apparel, which grew 150% for the entire company in the past year and 7% in 2019.

“During COVID[-19], they said no one would ever wear a suit again,” said Paul Smith, “which I never believed. But people are looking for refinement. They go back to work, get married, go to events. And there is also a big color trend that really resonates with people.

The Paul Smith brand has long been known for its bright colors and upbeat messages, which connect with pandemic-weary audiences. The designer pointed to the preponderance of stripes across the store’s collection, saying he designed a stripe in 1997 for the spring season and thought it would only be for that year. But it’s become so popular that it’s now featured on everything from men’s and women’s clothing to shoes and accessories, and has become a brand signature.

Another thing the brand has become known for is its store on Melrose Place in Los Angeles with its pink Pepto-Bismol wall which has become the most Instagrammed building in California with some 400 people a day taking pictures of the exterior, did he declare.

Paul Smith in his London studio.
Kuba Dabrowski/WWD

It also helped the store, which opened in 2005, become the brand’s largest unit in the United States, where the brand now operates seven stores, said Jeremy Smith. During the pandemic, the company has opened “neighborhood stores” in Williamsburg in Brooklyn as well as downtown Los Angeles, which are “doing well,” he said. “There was no tourism and people weren’t traveling, but a local clientele was still arriving.”

Going forward, the company will open additional stores in the United States, “but we don’t have any plans at this time as everything is on hold,” said Paul Smith.

Jeremy Smith added that there was “an appetite for the brand here” and that the company plans to add stores again from next year. This could include a unit in uptown Manhattan, perhaps on Madison Avenue. “We had a great deal with Barneys,” said Jeremy Smith.

The company’s online business has been strong, he said, with sales up 36% from 2019 and 75% from a year ago.

In addition to direct-to-consumer sales, the Paul Smith brand has a successful wholesale business with distribution in 64 countries. This channel has consistently grown 10% globally each season, said Jeremy Smith, “and more in the US”

The designer will fuel that momentum when he returns to the catwalk during Paris Men’s Fashion Week on June 24.

Paul Smith, who celebrated his 50th birthday in 2020, is one of Britain’s most successful independent designers, building a business with sales of over £215m and profits of around £4m. books. And it won’t stop anytime soon. “We feel we have a lot of momentum,” said Jeremy Smith.

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Top 5 Things To Do In Cincinnati This Weekend: May 13-15 https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/top-5-things-to-do-in-cincinnati-this-weekend-may-13-15/ Wed, 11 May 2022 02:06:20 +0000 https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/top-5-things-to-do-in-cincinnati-this-weekend-may-13-15/ 1. “Elegies for Angels, Punks and Raging Queens” Ensemble Theater has partnered with Caracole to present “Elegies for Angels, Punks and Raging Queens”, a play told via free verse monologues and songs with a blues, jazz and rock score that share the stories of 31 people from all walks of life who are affected by […]]]>

1. “Elegies for Angels, Punks and Raging Queens”

Ensemble Theater has partnered with Caracole to present “Elegies for Angels, Punks and Raging Queens”, a play told via free verse monologues and songs with a blues, jazz and rock score that share the stories of 31 people from all walks of life who are affected by HIV/AIDS. Written by Bill Russell and Janet Hood and told from the perspective of both those who died and those left behind, it offers a broad overview of the impact of the AIDS crisis on individuals, families and communities.

There are 13 opportunities to catch this dynamic play, premiering at 7 p.m. Friday at the Gallagher Student Center Theater at Xavier University (3800 Victory Parkway, Evanston). On Saturdaythe play will be performed at 3 p.m. at Hoffner Park (4101 Hamilton Ave., Northside) and at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Seasongood Pavilion in Eden Park (1600 Art Museum Drive, Mount Adams). Future performances take place every weekend until June 26 at various locations around the city. It’s free and open to the public. The production contains strong language and adult content, including depictions of violence, homophobia, adultery, and drug use, as well as discussions of sexual identity. Sign up for free tickets: togethercincinnati.org.

A 2014 performance photo of the Cincinnati Ballet dancers in

2. Cincinnati Ballet: Festival of Bold Moves

The Cincinnati Ballet season wraps up with the launch of something completely new: the Bold Moves Festival. This immersive dance experience features six rotating productions on stage accompanied by a variety of interactive activities and events. It features Ohad Naharin’s seminal work, “Minus 16”, as well as the world premiere of “Our Story” by company soloist David Morse, as well as regional premieres of “Bloom” by Annabelle Lopez Ochoa and “Petal” by Helen Pickett.

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Clerenwell Design Week spreads around London with over 150 showrooms https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/clerenwell-design-week-spreads-around-london-with-over-150-showrooms/ Mon, 09 May 2022 09:30:38 +0000 https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/clerenwell-design-week-spreads-around-london-with-over-150-showrooms/ It’s the season of spring in London and the 11and edition of Clerkenwell Design Week (CDW) is blooming in the streets. From May 24 to 26, the festival takes over the city’s flagship design and architecture district with more exhibitors, showrooms and venues than ever before. Visitors can expect a show filled with the latest […]]]>

It’s the season of spring in London and the 11and edition of Clerkenwell Design Week (CDW) is blooming in the streets. From May 24 to 26, the festival takes over the city’s flagship design and architecture district with more exhibitors, showrooms and venues than ever before. Visitors can expect a show filled with the latest creative ideas, as well as hundreds of fringe design-focused events, pop-ups, workshops, talks and presentations in the showrooms.

2019 welcomed more than 34,000 visitors from 66 different countries – get your free ticket here.

(above) Lisa Swing designed by Marcello Ziliani for S•CAB

(banner) Lisa Sofà Club, Lisa Lounge Club, Lisa Lounge Sidetable designed by Marcello Ziliani for S•CAB

all images courtesy of Clerkenwell Design Week

Spread over three days, from May 24 to 26, 2022, CDW is the UK’s leading independent design festival, providing a welcoming platform for brands to showcase their wares. The festival program has been designed to reflect the unique nature of this culturally rich region which hosts exhibition halls, side events, talks, workshops and installations. Additionally, the event is expected to host a series of talks from personalities in the creative field, addressing topical and newsworthy issues.

Clerenwell Design Week spreads around London with over 150 showrooms
Palissade Park Dining Bench by HAY

Cult Danish design brand HAY presents, installs its stylish outdoor furniture in The Long Walk, part of Crypt on the Green, and hosts a number of events throughout the week. Additionally, the official automotive sponsor of the event Porsche will showcase the brilliance of the Taycan’s design in an interactive installation.

Clerenwell Design Week spreads around London with over 150 showrooms
Sling chair by Ethimo and Studiopepe

cdw 2022 offers 10 EXHIBITION venues

CDW exhibits are housed in distinctive spaces – both purpose-built and historic locations – around the area connected by a route through the center. Ten exhibitions are set for 2022, each with a different curatorial focus ranging from cutting-edge international design to emerging talent, lighting, luxury interiors and the best of British design. Clerkenwell Underground House of Detention, formerly a prison in the mid-19th century, exhibits Light + rising stars where a host of upcoming designers exhibit alongside major lighting brands. POPULAR the former cold store-turned-nightclub is a must-see, hosting pop-up brand activations and immersive experiences throughout the three-day festival.

Clerenwell Design Week spreads around London with over 150 showrooms
furniture by WOUD

Located at the north end of Clerkenwell, ‘Design Fields’ sponsored by Clippings hosts a bustling centre, showcasing leading design furniture, textiles and products from around the world, from kitchens to bathrooms to the workplace. International design brands include Thonet, TONNEand Puntas well as an additional Danish company WUDand The furniture workshopa leading design firm in India.

Clerenwell Design Week spreads around London with over 150 showrooms
Block sofa and patio coffee table by Sabine Marcelis for Natuzzi Italia, part of the 2022 collection previewed at CDW 2022

Also in the areas of design, Natuzzi Italy previews its 2022 collection as part of its Circle of Harmony exhibition, featuring works by Sabine Marcelis, Formafantasma, Patrick Nourguet, Marcel Wanders Studio, Lorenza Boxxoli, Massimo Iosa Ghini, Marco Piva and Elena Salmistaro. The works on display focus on functionality, sustainability and well-being under the title of “a new era of harmony”.

Clerenwell Design Week spreads around London with over 150 showrooms
Swarf Hardware Prototypes and Swarf x Yuri Suzuki Chimes

‘Elements’ brings together a leading selection of hardware, hardware, switch plates and architectural fixtures in a street market-style pavilion in St John’s Square, becoming a go-to destination for designers looking for the perfect finishing touch . Featured is a UK company Chip hardwarewhich also presents a new collection with Adam Nathaniel Furman as well as a collaboration of decorative hanging bells, “Chimes”, with renowned designer Yuri Suzuki. The other participating designers are Armac-Martin, Dowsing and Reynoldsdutch brand Titanium Hotspot and British designer, Samuel Heath.

Clerenwell Design Week spreads around London with over 150 showrooms
Art wallcovering

‘Retail’ hosted at the Order of St. John reflects the principles of fine craftsmanship and high glamour, showcasing the most prestigious names in luxury interiors. For this year’s edition, Meridiani creates a room like pop-up experience in space, while Up to Sinclair invests the entire underground crypt to create an immersive experience. Kirkby Design and art also present works.

Clerenwell Design Week spreads around London with over 150 showrooms
Textile Lamp by Cindy Lilen Studio

In “Light + Rising Stars”House of Detention is filled with top lighting brands, including Italian companies, Artemis and Penta Lightand British brands, spark and bell and John Cullen Lighting, among others. The participating designers also take up the challenge of each appropriating a Victorian prison cell to create mini light installations. It should be mentioned that the Patagonian textile designer Cindy Lilen Studio creates a large-scale installation composed of multiple types of textile lamps, inspired by the Mapuche culture originating from Patagoniawhile Design by Anna Hayman, Rankin rug and Studio Arvor complete the space.

Clerenwell Design Week spreads around London with over 150 showrooms
Attitude Collection by Leonardo

From walls to floors in the commercial, residential and hospitality sectors, ‘Covered’ is another new exhibition for 2022 dedicated to interior surfaces, sponsored by the global bathroom brand Ceramic RAK. Included are the Italian brand ARCA, Leonardo and Panaria Group.

Clerenwell Design Week spreads around London with over 150 showrooms
Kettal ringtone collection

Smart work company Orangebox celebrates 20 years at CDW. Basque Living presents in its showroom major brands from the Spanish Basque region, including Ondaretta, Treku, Sellux, Daisalux, Aeneas and Ojmar. Leading Spanish company, Kettal are another new brand participating in 2022, showcasing their latest outdoor furniture and workspace products in their showroom.

Clerenwell Design Week spreads around London with over 150 showrooms
Melina and Io Desert Pendant by Hand & Eye Studio

For its fifth year, “British Collection” is located in the atmospheric crypt of the Church of St. James. The exhibition features designers from across the UK, bringing their latest furniture, lighting and product designs to this historically rich space, showcasing artisan techniques, quality materials and design excellence.

The space accommodates Reference that create a large-scale stand-alone display, as well as Dare Studio, Another country and Roger Lewis. From the forest to the house presents its highly sustainable furniture created from scrap wood, while the lighting company Hands & Eyes Studio presents their Mela and Melina collections designed by Mentsen, as well as the handmade Morandi collection designed and produced in collaboration with an expert ceramist and glassmaker Linda Bloomfield.

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Melissa Forsythe’s Iconic Kentucky Derby Hat Collection https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/melissa-forsythes-iconic-kentucky-derby-hat-collection/ Sat, 07 May 2022 17:44:00 +0000 https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/melissa-forsythes-iconic-kentucky-derby-hat-collection/ Many of the hats Melissa wore during her six years co-hosting WHAS11’s Derby cover were specially designed for her by famed New York designer Frank Olive. LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Bright, colorful, bold, and tailor-made for the Kentucky Derby, the late Melissa Forsythe’s collection of Derby hats are perfectly curated, still in their boxes. Forsythe, a […]]]>

Many of the hats Melissa wore during her six years co-hosting WHAS11’s Derby cover were specially designed for her by famed New York designer Frank Olive.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Bright, colorful, bold, and tailor-made for the Kentucky Derby, the late Melissa Forsythe’s collection of Derby hats are perfectly curated, still in their boxes.

Forsythe, a former WHAS11 presenter, died in early February at the age of 71.

She left behind 31 hats, many more were donated before her death.

“They reminded me of her,” said Forsythe’s sister, Cynthia Gibbs. “Because they are chic and pretty.”

Gibbs manages Forsythe’s estate and said she is looking to donate some of her sister’s hats to organizations in Kentuckiana that empower women.

Four of Forsythe’s hats have already been donated to the Frazier History Museum where they will be displayed in an upcoming exhibit.

“I wanted someone to have them who would do something nice with them,” Gibbs said. “Whether it’s for personal use or for people who need a job and need a nice hat to wear, something like that.”

During her 12-year career at WHAS-TV, Melissa was co-anchor of the station’s Derby coverage for 6 years from 1985 to 1991.

Many hats were specially designed for Forsythe by famed New York hat designer Frank Olive, who died in 1995.

Her fashionable hats always received rave reviews from viewers. They tell of a golden era of television and Derby coverage. The collection stands out today as timeless.

The search for the perfect Derby hat was similar in how Forsythe approached his career as a journalist, with dedication and excellence.

“She was very involved in what she was doing, she wanted to do a good job,” Gibbs said. “She appreciated her fans that she got letters from and all that, and I think it would mean a lot to her to be remembered so well.”

If you know of an organization or individual in Kentuckiana who would like some of Forsythe’s hats donated to them, email WHAS11 anchor Doug Proffitt.

Make it easier to update with more stories like this. Download the WHAS11 News app now. For Apple or android users.

Do you have a topical tip? E-mail assign@whas11.comvisit our Facebook page or Twitter feed.

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The spectacular Tanglewood house becomes a wonderland for fabulous clothes, divine jewelry and sassy hats https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/the-spectacular-tanglewood-house-becomes-a-wonderland-for-fabulous-clothes-divine-jewelry-and-sassy-hats/ Fri, 06 May 2022 00:26:11 +0000 https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/the-spectacular-tanglewood-house-becomes-a-wonderland-for-fabulous-clothes-divine-jewelry-and-sassy-hats/ IIt was one of those rare afternoons where fashion, fabulous hats and fine jewelry converge – over a distinguished lunch at one of Tanglewood’s most elegant homes. Thanks, Amir Taghi, Franco Valobra and Therese Foglia for accommodation, as well as PaperCityan intimate meeting of the elegance of the South. Only a month earlier, the Iranian-American […]]]>

IIt was one of those rare afternoons where fashion, fabulous hats and fine jewelry converge – over a distinguished lunch at one of Tanglewood’s most elegant homes. Thanks, Amir Taghi, Franco Valobra and Therese Foglia for accommodation, as well as PaperCityan intimate meeting of the elegance of the South.

Only a month earlier, the Iranian-American Taghi had returned from his studio in New York to show his most recent collection at a similar party at her parents’ house – a stunning abode with museum-quality artwork and gleaming antique Baccarat chandeliers and sconces.

Champagne flutes in hand, guests strolled through the dining room where to-die-for jewelry from Valobra’s ongoing collection was on display and the family room where Valobra Master Jewelers presented the new jewelry collection, which, for the record, made this band swoon. We observed several women taking note of certain pieces placed on their must-have list for Mother’s Day and special birthdays.

“Apart from Valobra’s collection, my sister (Cristina) collaborated and helped design this collection with a very talented Italian company called Verdi,” says Valobra. “It’s the first time it’s been shown in the United States, the first time it’s left Italy and we really love it. We love coral. We love turquoise.

“We love summer coloring. But in the United States you can wear coral all year round, especially in the south and certainly in Texas. I like the fact that it’s jewelry that you can wear day and night. Diamonds are still present but not massively present. Colors are the base and the most important factor.

Also in the dining room, Foglia’s team had covered the top of the grand piano with a selection of couture hats that have been all the rage since the designer’s boutique opened in the River Oaks neighborhood.

Franco Valobra, Kristin Van Ness, Isabella Reimer, Cristina Valobra at the Spring Luncheon showcasing the new jewelry collection.

Once seated at the three dining tables, flowers made in antique vases by Taghi (another of her creative inclinations), the ladies were treated to a parade of creations from her fall ’22 collection, a vibrant display by the designer of 26 years old refined talent.

And, yes, several of the ladies have signed for pieces in the collection, including Roslyn Bazzelle Mitchell, who wore one of Taghi’s colorful dresses for the Evening in the Park fundraiser hosted by the Hermann Park Conservancy. Many were devotees such as Leigh Smith and jesse rogerwho taught Taghi at Episcopal High School before heading to New York to earn a degree at Parsons School of Design.

Seen on PC: Kelley Lubanko, Catarina Valobra, Luvi Wheelock, Duyen Nguyen, Christie Sullivan, Mignon Gill, Amy Pierce, Kristin Van Ness, Isabella Reimer, Beth Zdeblick, Meredith Marshall, Joy Kubler, Tiffany Halik, Kendra Smith, Hannah Smith, by Valobra Kristen Canonand PaperCityit is Monica Bickers and Meredith Riddle Chastang.

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Ann and Gordon Getty’s personal collection to be auctioned off to benefit arts and science organizations https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/ann-and-gordon-gettys-personal-collection-to-be-auctioned-off-to-benefit-arts-and-science-organizations/ Tue, 03 May 2022 21:52:44 +0000 https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/ann-and-gordon-gettys-personal-collection-to-be-auctioned-off-to-benefit-arts-and-science-organizations/ The collection of art, furniture and artifacts collected by interior designer Ann Getty and her billionaire husband, composer Gordon Getty, during their 56-year marriage is now set to be auctioned , as the couple had planned for a long time. Profits will go to Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation for distribution to arts and science […]]]>

The collection of art, furniture and artifacts collected by interior designer Ann Getty and her billionaire husband, composer Gordon Getty, during their 56-year marriage is now set to be auctioned , as the couple had planned for a long time. Profits will go to Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation for distribution to arts and science organizations.

Christie’s, the auction house, is managing the auction of some 1,500 lots owned by the Gettys and displayed in their ornately decorated Pacific Heights mansion. The auction comes a year and a half after the death of Ann Getty, who died suddenly of a heart attack in September 2020, at the age of 79.

Gordon Getty, 88, tells the Chronicle in a statement, “It was our shared vision that we sell this collection and dedicate the proceeds to the California arts and cultural institutions that she and I have long supported.”

Getty said the collection is “truly a tribute to Ann’s unparalleled taste and style and the family home she has created for us in San Francisco.”

The collection is initially valued at more than $180 million and appears to be a wholesale drain of the Getty Mansion on Broadway in Pacific Heights – there are some pics here of Ann in the house several years ago, and discussing with Veranda magazine his love for chinoiserie and “Asian aesthetics, especially the eccentric style interpreted by and for Europeans”.

The house was the site of granddaughter Ivy Getty’s wedding reception last fall, which may have been the last major event to take place there before the art and furnishings were removed.

As Jonathan Rendell, Vice President and Senior Advisor to Christie’s Americas, describes the house’s design to the Chronicle, it “reflects perhaps a large London townhouse circa 1905. These are the conversational groupings (of art) , it’s the use of color, it’s the use of period textiles…. It’s the way in which the colors of the paintings and the colors of the textiles come together very subtly so that the whole thing becomes a work of art. (Ann Getty had her own interior design business in the 1970s and 80s, and she specialized in this kind of layered, historic look.)

Lots in the auction include a pastel, seen below, by pioneering American artist trained in France Mary Cassatt, hanging in Ann Getty’s bedroom. Cassatt’s works have sold at auction for up to $6 million in recent years. And there’s a Matisse painting of chrysanthemums that will probably cost as much.

“Young Woman in a Box Looking Right” by Mary Cassatt. Photo: Christie’s

Christie is plan a series of four sales in New York of the collection, between October 20 and 23.

As the Chronicle notes, recipients of auction proceeds are expected to include the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, University of San Francisco, San Francisco Opera, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, Center for Berkeley Geochronology and the Leakey Foundation.

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Golden-Era Backdrops Featured in New Museum Exhibit – The Hollywood Reporter https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/golden-era-backdrops-featured-in-new-museum-exhibit-the-hollywood-reporter/ Sun, 01 May 2022 21:33:05 +0000 https://michaelkorsoutlet--2013.com/golden-era-backdrops-featured-in-new-museum-exhibit-the-hollywood-reporter/ Set designer Thomas Walsh quotes a well-known saying of scenic artists and designers: “If you really notice the backdrop, it’s a failed backdrop.” Mammoth paintings designed to depict everything from Mount Rushmore to an office hallway or an Austrian mountain range may have been created to trick the eye and blend into the literal backdrop […]]]>

Set designer Thomas Walsh quotes a well-known saying of scenic artists and designers: “If you really notice the backdrop, it’s a failed backdrop.”

Mammoth paintings designed to depict everything from Mount Rushmore to an office hallway or an Austrian mountain range may have been created to trick the eye and blend into the literal backdrop of a movie. , but now they take center stage in a new museum exhibit just unveiled in South Florida. The Art of the Hollywood Backdrop: The Creative Legacy of Cinema opened April 20 at the Boca Raton Museum of Art and features 22 hand-painted sets from classic movies that include from north to northwest, Sing in the rain and The sound of musicas well as a handful that have yet to be assigned to specific films.

The exhibit is the brainchild of museum executive director Irvin Lippman, who watched CBS Sunday morning in February 2020 and caught a story that explored a renewed appreciation for the once forgotten backdrops of many films from Hollywood’s Golden Age. The segment included interviews with Walsh and with Karen Maness, assistant professor of scenic design and figurative painting at the University of Texas at Austin and co-author of a seminal book on the subject, 2016’s The Art of Hollywood Backdrop. A UT Austin alumnus, Lippman decided he would try to get in touch with Maness and figure out if the backdrops could be the subject of their own museum exhibit. “Once I spoke with Karen, it was obvious [that] there was enough to create an exhibit,” notes Lippman.

Like many classic movie artifacts, much of the exhibit’s sets were salvaged years ago from forgotten studio corners and basements, many by JC Backings, a Culver City company specializing in creating from sets to film and television rentals (while still producing hand-painted backdrops, many of today’s mediums are produced on vinyl or as digital art). The company was founded in 1962 by John Harold Coakley and John Gary Coakley, a father-son team with deep ties to the industry: many of their backers can be seen in the 1965s. The sound of musicwhile John Harold’s father, John Coakley, worked as a scenic artist under the legendary George Gibson, who ran MGM’s scenic design department from 1938 to 1968 (Gibson’s first film for the studio was 1939’s The Wizard of Oz, although his Technicolor-compatible backgrounds for this film are sadly lost). Over the years, JC Backings has purchased discarded sets from MGM, Disney, 20and Century Fox and other studios, in some cases saving them from the fate of dumpsters. “Without JC Backings, I’m not sure many of them would have survived,” Lippman says.

Walsh agrees. When John Gary Coakley’s daughter and current company president, Lynne Coakley, knew they would have to edit around 200 backdrops from their collection when they moved to a new headquarters, she called Walsh in New York. Mexico, where he worked on Netflix. Longmire, to ask him if he knew who might be interested in acquiring them. This conversation led Walsh to create the Art Directors Guild Backdrop Recovery Project, a project in which he, Maness and Coakley photographed and cataloged discarded backdrops, hoping to find new homes for each. “They determined there were 207 backdrops they weren’t going to take with them, pieces at the bottom of the pile that weren’t being rented,” Walsh says. He spent around two years seeking homes for the mounts around the world, various locations ranging from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences at UT Austin and the Royal Conservatory of Scotland in Glasgow, which gratefully accepted five sets painted by Gibson, who was Scottish by birth. The scenographer, to whom we also owe An American in Paris and Brigadoondied in 2001.

Fast forward to 2020, when Lippman was able to join Maness and offer his museum space for an exhibition. She immediately invited Walsh to co-host the event. “We knew treasures existed beyond the UT Austin collection, so we contacted JC Backings with a request to borrow 17 of their media, including the iconic paintings of Ben-Hur, north by northwestand The sound of musicManess adds, noting that Lynne Coakley’s company quickly agreed — and moved on. “Amazingly, they shared that they would prefer the loan be a donation to the Texas Performing Arts Hollywood Backdrop Collection at UT Austin as educational assets for future generations under my care and direction.”

Still from 1938 Marie Antoinette.
Boca Raton Art Museum

Strolling through the galleries of the Boca Raton Museum is indeed like taking a tour through the sound stages of Hollywood, from a painted trompe-l’oeil tapestry widely used in the 1938s. Marie Antoinette to a skyline of New York seen in the two years 1949 Source and televisions The Jeffersons and a vast cityscape of ancient Rome, originally painted for the years 1959 Ben Hur and later rented for reuse in the 2016 Coen Brothers film Hello, Caesar!

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Karen L. Maness and Thomas A. Walsh in front of a set of Sing in the rain.
Boca Raton Art Museum

Roped poles prevent visitors from getting too close, but this exhibition also represents the first time the public has been able to see such an extensive collection of hand-painted backdrops in person. “We want people to appreciate these works for their artistry,” Lippman says. “We invite you to take a close look and appreciate the details and brushstrokes.”

Among the backdrops are video screens that tell behind-the-scenes stories about the production design, with interviews that include Gibson, who was featured in the 1992 Turner Classic Movies documentary. MGM: When the lion roars. Next to a backdrop of a grand, curving staircase – among the “Unknown Film” pieces that are sure to thrill classic film fans’ brains about their origins – a wall lists around 100 scenic artists responsible for the sets. hand painted during the Golden Age of Hollywood. Unsurprisingly, men’s names dominate the list, although a few women’s names are scattered throughout. “One of the reasons we wanted to do this was to bring recognition to those who have never been recognized for the work they have done,” says Lippman. “At that time, studios didn’t recognize everyone on screen who worked on a film, but these were talented artists who made a real contribution.”

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Boca Raton Art Museum

Among the most popular photo backdrops among museum visitors, according to Lippman, is a waterfront scene from The sound of music and the depiction of an office hallway, seen during Donald O’Connor’s “Make ‘Em Laugh” number in 1952 Sing in the rain. A green fringe sofa and the stuffed fabric mannequin O’Connor used in the scene were also replicated for selfie moments. “People like to pretend to lean against the stone railing The sound of music backdrop, or they sit on the couch and pretend they’re Donald O’Connor,” Lippman says. “It was fun to see people enjoying these memories of their favorite movies in this way.”

In a belated move, Lippman realized there was a perfect spot for one of the largest sets included in the exhibit: a side view of Mount Rushmore, measuring 30 feet tall by 91 feet, 9 inches wide, used in from north to northwest and painted by Gibson and his team. “As we developed the exhibit, we realized that a perfect place for this backdrop was right in front of us the entire time,” Lippman says, pointing to the museum’s expansive two-story lobby. “Of course we had to tuck him in to the sides to get him to fit in here, but it was definitely a highlight to see him step up.” (A smaller backdrop of Mount Rushmore from a different angle, also from Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 thriller, currently resides at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles.)

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A backdrop of Mount Rushmore used in from north to northweston display at the Boca Raton Museum of Art.
Boca Raton Art Museum

Ultimately, what does Lippman hope visitors will feel about the exhibit? “A lot of us grew up with those movies, and those memories can be very powerful,” he says. “You see people recognizing those moments in their favorite movies, and that impact is pretty special. I also hope younger generations see something that resonates with them and that it inspires an appreciation for those movies in an audience that doesn’t has not experienced them yet.

“Art of the Hollywood Backdrop: Cinema’s Creative Legacy” runs through January 22, 2023; an adjoining exhibition, “Bonnie Lautenberg: Art Meets Hollywood”, features the Palm Beach-based artist’s pairings of film stills with iconic artwork released the same year and runs through August 21, 2022. For more information, visit bocamuseum.org.

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