Recognize: Heavee | DJMag.com

Another source of inspiration was Kode9’s book, Sonic Warfare: Sound, Affect, and the Ecology of Fear. Heavee named one of his own tracks “Sonic Warfare” and sent it to the founder of Hyperdub – it’s now the closing track of his EP. “I named the track ‘Sonic Warfare’ out of respect for his musical ideals,” they divulged. “It can be weaponized, and music doesn’t just have one purpose. And it comes back to my ideas of how I found electronic music – music doesn’t have to follow this format or this arrangement.

For Heavee, 2023 will mark 10 years that the producer has known Hyperdub, making this year’s EP a milestone in his career. One of the London label’s most famous signings was Heavee’s mentor, the late footwork pioneer, DJ Rashad. Their smile fills the screen of our Zoom call as they reminisce about the pioneering artist. “Even when I was out of town, I would send him music. When I was in school, I would send music. And he would leave me voicemails, criticizing me. Right away , if he liked it, he’d tell me. If he didn’t, he’d tell me,” Heavee says. “He helped me keep producing when I felt like I didn’t. had no reason to do so because I was in a new environment. And he made me continue. So when I came back I said I wanted to be in Teklife and [Rashad] was like, ‘Let’s do this’.

The two collaborated together on “It’s Wack” in 2013 for FlyLo FM, a radio station hosted by Flying Lotus in Grand Theft Auto V – a looping moment for video game enthusiast Heavee. “I never used any of the equipment they had, but my voice was something that Rashad felt like I could use as an instrument. – No, you have a great voice. Pause’ – it was just like he said so,” they fondly recall. The track was also featured on Heavee’s debut album “WFM,” released in 2018 on Teklife.

Like swapping moves or collaborating on choreography in times of animosity, Heavee is now trying to bring the game to new faces on the footwork scene. He jokes, “I don’t have a direct mentee or anyone I’m raising – I’m gonna raise a freak, yo!”

The support they received from Kode9 and DJ Rashad showed them the value of helping to raise a new generation. “I realize that we are not the end of everything, be everything. It will continue to grow with or without us and I prefer to be on the safe side. [I] just [want to] to be able to share something and help someone younger get to where I am right now, at least twice as fast and just as good.

Listen to Heavee’s Recognize mix below.

Comments are closed.