Remembering Issey Miyake – The New Indian Express

Express press service

The disappearance of the Japanese designer has left a void in the fashion world. TNIE talks to designers in Kerala about its influence on them

Jebin Johny, designer and founder of Jebsispar
Miyake is always exploring fabric and its relationship to the human body. We all have an unconscious personal relationship with the fabrics we wear. Also, his idea of ​​finding beauty in the unfinished and neglected influenced me. Personally, ‘Pleats Please’ by Miyake is what I love the most. Light and thin folds look simple. Her words, “I don’t create a fashion aesthetic, I create a style based on life” are so powerful that I resonate with them. The clothes I create tell my story and it gives an ultimate feeling of satisfaction. Issey Miyake fragrances also have a distinct fanbase.

Gayathri Mohan, Content Creator
I really resonate with his “why bother designing unless you have a unique point of view” philosophy in all aspects of my career. This varied thinking is what made him a pioneer in the fashion world. Most of Miyake’s clothes have a shape. And they are comfortable. Its incorporation of technology has given freedom of movement and fashionable functionality. His collection finds harmony between texture and color. In short, his creations are nothing less than “wearable art”. I find his collection of molded breastplates iconic. Issey always goes the extra mile for her fashion shows. These events were like a play. This kind of quality show will be greatly missed by the fashion world.

Sreejith Jeevan, designer and founder of Rouka
I first heard of Issey Miyake when I was studying textiles at the National Institute of Design. His works are indeed the dream of any design student. The reason is that it has created a new context and challenged the norms of what is traditionally considered fashion. Miyake effortlessly blends portability and drama – an approach he pulled off with such ease. Of all his works, my favorite would have to be the APOC-‘A Piece of Cloth’ collection. As a textile designer, seeing how a piece of fabric can turn into such unique pieces and that too with minimal waste was inspiring. Also in most of his works he has gracefully brought together modernity and tradition on the same stage. It inspired me deeply.

The disappearance of the Japanese designer has left a void in the fashion world. TNIE speaks to designers in Kerala about its influence on them Jebin Johny, designer and founder of Jebsispar Miyake is always exploring fabric and its relationship with the human body. We all have an unconscious personal relationship with the fabrics we wear. Also, his idea of ​​finding beauty in the unfinished and neglected influenced me. Personally, ‘Pleats Please’ by Miyake is what I love the most. Light and thin folds look simple. Her words, “I don’t create a fashion aesthetic, I create a style based on life” are so powerful that I resonate with them. The clothes I create tell my story and it gives an ultimate feeling of satisfaction. Issey Miyake fragrances also have a distinct fan base. Gayathri Mohan, Content Creator I really resonate with his “why bother designing unless you have a unique point of view” philosophy in all aspects of my career. This varied thinking is what made him a pioneer in the fashion world. Most of Miyake’s clothes have a shape. And they are comfortable. Its incorporation of technology has given freedom of movement and fashionable functionality. His collection finds harmony between texture and color. In short, his creations are nothing less than “wearable art”. I find his collection of molded breastplates iconic. Issey always goes the extra mile for her fashion shows. These events were like a play. This kind of quality show will be greatly missed by the fashion world. Sreejith Jeevan, designer and founder of Rouka I first heard of Issey Miyake when I was studying textiles at the National Institute of Design. His works are indeed the dream of any design student. The reason is that it has created a new context and challenged the norms of what is traditionally considered fashion. Miyake effortlessly blends portability and drama – an approach he pulled off with such ease. Of all his works, my favorite would have to be the APOC-‘A Piece of Cloth’ collection. As a textile designer, seeing how a piece of fabric can turn into such unique pieces and that too with minimal waste was inspiring. Also in most of his works he has gracefully brought together modernity and tradition on the same stage. It inspired me deeply.

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